comicsalliance:

AN AWESOME GIRL GROUP RECORDED THE MARY JANES’ SONG FROM ‘EDGE OF SPIDER-VERSE’ #2

By Matt D. Wilson

In case you haven’t read it yet (and missed our review), Edge of Spider-Verse #2 by Jason LaTour and Robbi Rodriguez is a fantastic comic. It introduces an alternate-universe Gwen Stacy who become Spider-Woman and is on the run from the cops after being blamed for the death of poor old Peter Parker. It also involves an awesome element: A band called The Mary Janes, in which Gwen is the drummer, Mary Jane Watson is the lead singer/bassist, Glory Grant is the keyboardist, and Betty Brant plays lead guitar.

That’d be cool enough on its own, but a band called Married With Sea Monsters took it a step further. They’ve actually recorded a version of the song from the comic, “Face It Tiger,” and posted it to YouTube.

READ MORE

129 notes

comicsalliance:

THE FIRST THING I MADE WAS A WEAPON: THE MULTIVERSITY ANNOTATIONS, PART 2 
By David Uzumeri
Teased for years and finally launched in 2014, The Multiversity is a universe-jumping series of DC Comics one-shots tracking the cosmic monitor Nix Uotan and an assemblage of star-crossed heroes as they attempt to save 52 universes and beyond from a trippy cosmic existential threat that, like much of Morrison’s best work, represents something far more mundane and relatable. Tying back into the very first Multiverse story in DC’s history, the heroes of these universes become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. Indeed, writer Grant Morrison continues his streak of highly metatextual DC cosmic epics with this eight-issue mega-series (plus one Tolkienesque guidebook).
Described by Morrison as “the ultimate statement of what DC is”, The Multiversity naturally offers the reader much beyond the surface level adventure, and that means annotations. Rather than merely filling out checklists of references, my hope with this feature is to slowly unearth and extrapolate a narrative model for Morrison and his collaborators’ work on The Multiversity; an interconnecting web of themes and cause and effect that works both on literal and symbolic levels.
We’ll be focusing here on the second issue of the maxiseries, the unwieldily titled The Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World, written by Grant Morrison with pencils by Tom Strong‘s Chris Sprouse, inks by Karl Story and Walden Wong, and gorgeous colors by Dave McCaig.
I’ll admit here from the beginning that while I can talk about this series’ relationship to the DC Universe and Morrison’s oeuvre, I’m close to clueless about the vagaries of early 20th century pulp fiction and would be incredibly interested in hearing from more learned readers whatever I’ve missed from that angle. That said, there’s still a great deal of meat to dig into in this issue, which serves as a sort of conceptual counterpoint to Final Crisis‘s opening scene, showing us the end of Anthro and Vandal Savage’s 40,000-year feud.
READ THE SOCIETY OF SUPER-HERO ANNOTATIONS

comicsalliance:

THE FIRST THING I MADE WAS A WEAPON: THE MULTIVERSITY ANNOTATIONS, PART 2 

By David Uzumeri

Teased for years and finally launched in 2014, The Multiversity is a universe-jumping series of DC Comics one-shots tracking the cosmic monitor Nix Uotan and an assemblage of star-crossed heroes as they attempt to save 52 universes and beyond from a trippy cosmic existential threat that, like much of Morrison’s best work, represents something far more mundane and relatable. Tying back into the very first Multiverse story in DC’s history, the heroes of these universes become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. Indeed, writer Grant Morrison continues his streak of highly metatextual DC cosmic epics with this eight-issue mega-series (plus one Tolkienesque guidebook).

Described by Morrison as “the ultimate statement of what DC is”, The Multiversity naturally offers the reader much beyond the surface level adventure, and that means annotations. Rather than merely filling out checklists of references, my hope with this feature is to slowly unearth and extrapolate a narrative model for Morrison and his collaborators’ work on The Multiversity; an interconnecting web of themes and cause and effect that works both on literal and symbolic levels.

We’ll be focusing here on the second issue of the maxiseries, the unwieldily titled The Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World, written by Grant Morrison with pencils by Tom Strong‘s Chris Sprouse, inks by Karl Story and Walden Wong, and gorgeous colors by Dave McCaig.

I’ll admit here from the beginning that while I can talk about this series’ relationship to the DC Universe and Morrison’s oeuvre, I’m close to clueless about the vagaries of early 20th century pulp fiction and would be incredibly interested in hearing from more learned readers whatever I’ve missed from that angle. That said, there’s still a great deal of meat to dig into in this issue, which serves as a sort of conceptual counterpoint to Final Crisis‘s opening scene, showing us the end of Anthro and Vandal Savage’s 40,000-year feud.

READ THE SOCIETY OF SUPER-HERO ANNOTATIONS

27 notes

comicsalliance:

BATMAN IS A FACT OF LIFE: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART THREE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.
In part one of our in-depth interview, Rucka discussed his arrival in Gotham with the popular “No Man’s Land” megaseries. In part two, the writer detailed his involvement in the “New Gotham” revamp of 2000, including the Bruce Wayne: Fugitive saga, the introduction of Sasha Bordeaux, and the difficult transition from longtime Batmang group editor Dennis O’Neil to Bob Schreck.
Today we finish our three-part interview series with a look at Gotham Central, the book that focused on the non-superhero police detectives of Gotham City. Rucka speaks at length about how looking at Batman from the outside changes how the character works, the nature of collaboration with series co-writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark, and how the book produced one of the greatest Joker stories of all time.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

BATMAN IS A FACT OF LIFE: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART THREE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

In part one of our in-depth interview, Rucka discussed his arrival in Gotham with the popular “No Man’s Land” megaseries. In part two, the writer detailed his involvement in the “New Gotham” revamp of 2000, including the Bruce Wayne: Fugitive saga, the introduction of Sasha Bordeaux, and the difficult transition from longtime Batmang group editor Dennis O’Neil to Bob Schreck.

Today we finish our three-part interview series with a look at Gotham Central, the book that focused on the non-superhero police detectives of Gotham City. Rucka speaks at length about how looking at Batman from the outside changes how the character works, the nature of collaboration with series co-writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark, and how the book produced one of the greatest Joker stories of all time.

READ MORE

38 notes

benito-cereno:

comicsalliance:

THE TOP TEN CLASSIC SUPERMAN CREATIONS OF OTTO BINDER

By Chris Sims

If there’s one thing we’ve learned from our years on the Internet, it’s that there’s no aspect of comics that can’t be broken down and quantified in a single definitive list, preferably in amounts of ten. And since there’s no more definitive authority than ComicsAlliance, we’re taking it upon ourselves to compile Top Ten Lists of everything you could ever want to know about comics.

This week, with the help of CA contributor Benito Cereno, we’re bringing you the ten best Superman creations of the best Superman writer ever, Otto Binder. From Krypto to Supergirl and even all the way to Lucy Lane, they’re all here!

Show Notes:

  • All of Binder’s amazing Silver Age Superman creations (with the exception of Lucy Lane, that horrible jerk) can be found in DC’s Showcase Presents Superman volumes.

#BINDER DID IT

(Source: comicsalliance.com)

33 notes

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.
Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.
READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.

READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

212 notes

Armored Against Reality: How Batman is Losing His Realness

By Weird Beard and Bunnypwn Gold

“… missionaries who attempted to impose their own values and preconceptions on cultures they considered inferior—in this case, that of superheroes. Missionaries humiliate the natives by pointing out their gauche customs and colorfully frank traditional dress. They bullied defenseless fantasy characters into leather trench coats and nervous breakdowns and left formerly carefree fictional communities in a state of crushing self-doubt and dereliction. Anthropologists on the other hand, surrendered themselves to foreign cultures. They weren’t afraid to go native or look foolish. They came and they departed with respect and in the interests of mutual understanding. Naturally, I wanted to be an anthropologist.”

- Grant Morrison 

You may have seen the recent photos of the newest onscreen version of the Batmobile (as seen above). We have issues with this Batmobile, mainly that the design is derivative of the previous Batmobile and, more importantly, that it has guns on its hood. This is not first Batmobile to have guns. Tim Burton’s Batman film included guns on the Batmoblie as does the Batmoblie in the Batman: Arkham Knight game. But the guns and the armor of Batman seen in the Nolan films, the upcoming Snyder film, and even the Arkham games (with each becoming more and more armored) point to an underlying problem with Batman (and plenty of other heroes) both on the page and on screen, that it presents a character in an ever-increasingly violent and pessimistic world where Batman’s actions, while heroic to a point, seem ultimately futile because the world itself is not built upon hope. The origin of this trend can be traced back to two stories printed in a single year—The Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns in 1986 (The modes of thought that influenced these two works can be traced back to the literary movements of realism and modernism). While both seminal works for many reasons, they did have an unintended consequence upon superhero storytelling that started in the comics and has made its on screen: people equate and mistake pessimism for realism. 

It’s an easy mistake to make because of the tragedy that often comes with pessimistic tones in stories and we equate the emotional trauma with being more ‘real’ because it affects us on multiple levels. The physical or intellectual brutality that is either overtly shown or implied in stories with these tones, as seen with Batman’s armor, is a sad and violent thing. Sadness and violence are often associated with being more adult, because these are two narrative elements that are not a part of media for children. So, when we transition from childhood/adolescence to adulthood, we equate the loss of childhood innocence with sadness and violence because these narrative elements supplant the previous wonder and infinite possibility of the world as our new basis for the foundations our perception of reality. Therefore, when we see brutal events in our stories, we think of these things as being more real because it resonates with that new foundation of perceived reality.

But here’s the problem with equating pessimism for realism: the wonder and infinite possibility of the world never went away. Our brains were just adjusting to be able to handle these previously under-processed aspects of the world. This was our brains suffering from cognitive dissonance as it gained new information about the world. We started to recognize somethings as impossible or not as wonderful as before, and because our brains were changing, we stared to focus on and associate violence and reality to the point where we started to assume violence was an inherent property of reality. And this is not to say that violence is not a part of reality, but that it is just that: a single aspect of a wonderfully complex and seemingly contradictory world.

John Keats, a man considered to be one the finest poets in the English language, once posited the idea of negative capability, which is the term to describe the capacity to be “in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reasons” (Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms). For Keats, the ability to remain open-minded with mystery without trying to rationalize it was key to perceiving reality in its manifold complexity. Keats understood this idea in a more metaphysical manner, but let us consider this idea in terms of a spectrum from low to high, with high negative capability being considered in the metaphysical sense that Keats understood it in and low negative capability being considered as understanding that altruism and pessimism are equally real and conceptual neighbors in the human mind. If we consider superhero comics through the low end of this Keatsian spectrum, then it means that Batman fighting crime in his zebra suit is just as real and valid as the high tech, militarized vigilante we see in the Arkham games, which is just a magnified version the Batman in armor seen battling Superman at the end of The Dark Knight Returns.

The problem is not which Batman interpretation is better or real, but that the one that is obviously more violent is popularly being labeled as being the ‘realistic’ one, and quite frankly, this is depressing. It’s depressing because it implies that people ultimately do not see the world as a place with possibility or hope, because if there’s one thing fiction definitely does, it reflects our perceptions of our reality through authorial construction and consumer consumption. And this is why Batman’s armor is a symptom of a problem and not necessarily cool. 

But, there is hope. If we keep the newly constructed Keatsian spectrum in mind, we can see what realism really means. Narrative realism is not darkness and violence, but rather, narrative realism has a two tiered definition. The first tier being composed of two equally important elements: an authentic emotional experience and the maturity to treat all perspectives as equal and valid. The second tier is composed of two elements as well: statistically realistic representation of race and gender identity and  consistency of character, internal rules of the fiction, and fictional history. This definition of realism in narrative can be seen in a recent work in the Batman family of titles—Zero Year

Without spoiling too much, Zero Year is the newest origin story for the Batman as crafted by Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, Danny Miki and FCO Plascencia. In this epic vision of the origin of the Dark Knight, Batman confronts the void meaninglessness as represented in Red Hood One (the heavily hinted at identity of the Joker before he was the Joker), the terror of what man becomes when he is consumed by violence as represented in Dr. Death, and the terrifying power of man without a conscience as represented by The Riddler.  Zero Year is a story that does not flinch from the horrors of the world, but it does not allow these horrors to override the story. These horrors are balanced out in the end by the good Batman accomplishes, and more importantly, these elements are balanced out by the lessons of hope and faith in both himself and in his allies. Bruce Wayne is the perfect storm of determination, skill, and resources, but it all could have turned out so much differently if Bruce had allowed the darkness to consume him totally as reflected by each villain.

Neither the villains nor the heroes are treated in a simplistic manner, because they are each respected as individuals who are motivated by genuine aspects of the human experience and this is done so in a consistent manner. This is what makes the good guys winning feel rewarding, because they struggled against a threat that seemed just as real as any threat. The scale of action was raised to superheroic proportions, but the underlying emotional and intellectual elements driving everything seemed as authentic as anything in our reality. 

Batman is a realistic hero not because of his lack of powers, or because of the possibility that one could train to essentially be Batman in our world; he is a realistic hero because Batman deals with the same existential fears we all do and defines his place in the world in opposition to these fears and their physical manifestations. Batman feels real because, even though his threats may be exaggerated and fictional, they represent many real life struggles, and his eternal struggle against these threats is our struggle against these threats, no matter how mundane ours look by comparison. 

And here’s the thing about Zero Year: it is not the first Batman story (or superhero story, in general) to tackle the fears and horrors of the world while balancing them with a core of altruism, nor will it be the last story to do so. Batman’s power lies in that Bruce uses the Batman identity to build a better self to deal with the darkness of the world so that he and others can enjoy the light. At the heart of Batman, and the heart of all great superheroes, is the conscious and stylized rebellion against the nihilism that threatens to consume our minds. 

The above has all been looking at this problem of pessimism in Batman comics from a conceptual viewpoint, so let’s take this moment to switch gears and deal with Batman in his world. Let us become anthropologists for a moment. 

In Batman’s world, there is a city called Gotham that is plagued by many powerful criminal groups, as well as a number of strange, lone actors, and this city one night finds itself protected by a mysterious and altruistic man in black…and grey spandex with a bat on his chest who fights criminals with his fists and throwing knives because he fancies himself a ninja. If there is a better metaphor for taking the darkness and making it light-hearted than Batman’s ridiculous conception of a crime-fighting identity, we don’t know what is. Simply put, Batman is inherently a ridiculous and fantastic idea, and in a lot of worlds, he actually is around, Batman-ing it up.

But what is “Batman-ing?” This act involves a man using stealth tactics to take out criminals before they even know he’s there. The criminals that Batman usually goes after tend to be the kind the police can’t handle, like the big mob bosses or supervillains, not the average mugger. Still, that being said, most of the people Batman engages with directly are the same enemies as the police: gunmen, or similarly-armed men, hired by crime bosses or other powerful criminal interests. The police get by with vests, which they don’t even wear them all the time, and they stay in plain view of their enemies, talking to them and using no form of stealth to keep the bad guys off balance. It would seem Batman wearing as much armor as he does is simply not only unnecessary, but paranoid and insulting to the police.

Of course, Batman is a multi-billionaire vigilante. Perhaps he simply wants to use the best technology available to do his job better. He can afford full-body armor that protects him from gunfire, regular fire, knives, electricity, and chemicals along every square inch of his body. He can afford a literal tank mounted with a large number of guns, whether hidden or on display, and covered in many thick plates of armor. He’s a ninja who values being unseen, not engaging the enemy directly if he can avoid it, and winning before the first shot is fired, and he’s taking on the same mafia the police deal with on a daily basis: why wouldn’t he want better gear than soldiers who go up against much worse all the time? 

Ignoring how cowardly Batman sounds by needing to hide behind so much armor to do what he does, it really is a matter of practicality that he wouldn’t wear an Arkham-style suit. There’s a reason ninjas didn’t wear knight’s armor. Batman simply would not be able to move around all that well in such a suit, nor would he be able to carry around all that weight and still be stealthy. Has anyone ever tried to wear ten pounds of metal on each arm, twenty on each leg, and over thirty pounds on your torso, all with as little space around the joints as possible, and then tried to sneakily run along concrete or fight with gymnastic displays of martial arts prowess? For several hours a night? Probably not, because no one has, because that’s a really stupid idea. It’s unrealistic.

Beyond how hard it would be for someone, even someone as physically conditioned as Batman, to be Batman in such a suit, it simply is at cross-purposes with his tactics. Batman is supposed to stay in the shadows, to be the night, and take out the bad guys before they know he’s there. To phrase that differently, the entire premise of his battle plan is that his enemies won’t know where he is to begin with until he’s attacked them and they can’t defend in time. If that’s the case, why does he need such a heavily-armored suit? It just doesn’t make any sense for him to cover every single spot on his body, even the insides of his thighs, with titanium-dipped Kevlar to avoid the possible accidental bullet he might take, if he screws up.

Moving beyond Batman, we can look at heroes that operate in a similar manner as him. Green Arrow jumps to mind. Not only does Oliver Queen, who is every bit as rich as Bruce Wayne, not wear a Kevlar gimp suit, he doesn’t even seem to be wearing a bulletproof vest. Green Arrow’s costume is sleeveless. GA is also known for wearing a bright color all the time and using a weapon that requires he stands in one place for a moment and stand in a big, obvious pose to pin down enemies. Not only this, but because he’s known for sharpshooting, GA has more enemies than Batman that specialize in sniping. From a tactical standpoint, it seems like Green Arrow needs more armor than Batman, or at least some. But he doesn’t have any. 

Batman is known for fighting villains with mental problems of varying kinds. While this can probably be said of all supervillains and even a large number of superheroes, Batman is the only one known for having an entire mental health institution dedicated to rehabbing his rogue’s gallery. Batman effectively has been waging a war against mental illness, but not the kind that people like. We’re not saying that Batman shouldn’t stop his bad guys, but when that information is put in context with the kind of super-armor Batman wears now, the fact that Arkham Asylum was not a prominent fixture in the Batman world until after The Dark Knight Returns, and that similar heroes do not wear nearly as much, if any, armor, and you have a very depressing message about mental illness, how it should be viewed, and the ever-increasingly violent world that Batman seems to be inhabiting. 

Now that we’ve established how unrealistic the hyper-violent and depressing tone of Batman’s depiction in non-comic book mediums are and how unrealistic it is for him to wear the armor that symbolizes this tone, we must turn to the most essential question of all: why did we end up here? People have been obsessed with the concept of realistic superheroes since they were introduced in the eighties, and this has spread to a plea for more realism in comics in general. This gets back to the second tier of the definition of realism, appropriate statistical representation of minority groups and respectful, consistent character work. This second tier is a part of that definition partly because it gets into measurable signs of realism and partly because it’s a way of enacting more realism in comics. Comics, for most of its history, have been marketed almost exclusively to white, heterosexual boys and no one else. People want to see realism in the sense of the first tier of the definition, but they also want to see definite, concrete signs that the fictional world looks like their own.

We are starting to see some signs of this now in comics. Looking at the Batman corner of DC, we see Batwoman has had a recent and excellent run, we see the new Batgirl of Burnside look and direction coming soon, and we see the diverse cast of Gotham Academy. The last one has a female artist as well, and Batgirl was previously being written by Gail Simone, a writer known for character work and efforts to diversify the DC universe. These are all signs that the fictional DC world and the real-life DC staff is becoming more diverse and representative of the real world, giving strong evidence that they are trying to make their world more realistic by visual, concrete measure, i.e. in the terms of the second tier definition of realism. When many people ask for realism in comics, this is what they want. There are a lot of potential fans of superheroes who don’t want to get into comics because of this lack of diversity, both on the page and behind it. There are other potential fans who don’t want to get into them because too many titles are focused on the pessimistic realism that’s proliferated recently, for all the limited success it brings. There are still other real comics fans who stopped reading them because of that darkness. 

Superheroes and supervillains are inherently unrealistic concepts by their very nature, and that’s the entire point. We read them because we want to imagine a world where we can solve clinical depression, or economic recessions, or the unethical treatment of animals, etc., by punching it in the face. We read them because we want to imagine a world where hope walks in the shape of a human and wears bright, primary colors that inspire childlike joy and optimism. And maybe we read them because we want to imagine a world that looks that cool. There are a lot of reasons to read about superheroes. However, reading about how depraved and evil the world can get is not one of them, unless by the end hope wins out. If hope never wins, then the world is a terrible place no one wants to live in. Superheroes, by their very definition, are supposed to be able to eradicate that kind of evil, if only for a moment, because in a moment we can hope. Instead of embracing this, many comics creators seem to have decided they were embarrassed to like “kid’s stuff” and want to make it “mature, edgy, and real.” Their heroes are afraid of their own power and want to hide from the world. However, hope is not fake, it’s not a fantasy. Neither are the many disenfranchised masses that don’t get to be heroes, villains, or even victims in many cases. People want to see hope, they want to see happiness, they want to see a solution to their problems. The people who need this the most are those that don’t appear in comics now, the various minority and marginalized groups of America. Comics fans want to see both, and many of them want to see less of the evil and false sense of maturity that has leaked into their beloved heroes.

Bottom line, no amount of darkness, corruption, and depravity in Gotham City is going to make up for all the real feels and queer women of color we’re missing, because being grim and gritty just aren’t real enough.

1 note

jordiecolorsthings:

New project! New project! New project!
THEY’RE NOT LIKE US #1STORY: ERIC STEPHENSONART: SIMON GANE & JORDIE BELLAIRECOVER: SIMON GANE & FONOGRAFIKSDECEMBER 3 / 24 PAGES / FC / M / $2.99Eisner-nominated NOWHERE MEN writer ERIC STEPHENSON teams up with red-hot artist SIMON GANE for an all-new ongoing series!
We all have advantages over one another, but what if you were capable of things most of us can only imagine? What would you do – and who would you be? A doctor? An athlete? A soldier? A hero?Everyone has to make a choice about how to use the abilities they’re born with… but they’re not like us.

jordiecolorsthings:

New project! New project! New project!

THEY’RE NOT LIKE US #1
STORY: ERIC STEPHENSON
ART: SIMON GANE & JORDIE BELLAIRE
COVER: SIMON GANE & FONOGRAFIKS
DECEMBER 3 / 24 PAGES / FC / M / $2.99
Eisner-nominated NOWHERE MEN writer ERIC STEPHENSON teams up with red-hot artist SIMON GANE for an all-new ongoing series!

We all have advantages over one another, but what if you were capable of things most of us can only imagine? What would you do – and who would you be? A doctor? An athlete? A soldier? A hero?
Everyone has to make a choice about how to use the abilities they’re born with… but they’re not like us.

59 notes

phoning-it-in:

THE MULTIVERSITY: THUNDERWORLD #1
Written by GRANT MORRISON
Art and cover by CAMERON STEWART
1:10 B&W Variant cover by CAMERON STEWART
1:25 Variant cover by CLIFF CHIANG
1:50 Variant cover by CULLY HAMNER
1:100 Variant cover by GRANT MORRISON
On sale DECEMBER 17 • 48 pg, FC, $4.99 US • RATED T
Retailers: This issue will ship with five covers. Please see the order form for details.
The fifth chapter of the greatest adventure in DC Comics history is here!
Acclaimed for their collaborations on BATMAN AND ROBIN, SEAGUY and SEVEN SOLDIERS OF VICTORY: THE MANHATTAN GUARDIAN, superstar writer Grant Morrison and renowned artist Cameron Stewart deliver some magic to THE MULTIVERSITY with a breathtaking journey to Earth-5 – A.K.A. Thunderworld!
With a single word, Billy Batson transforms from boy reporter for Whiz Media into the world’s Mightiest Mortal – Captain Marvel! Along with the other members of the Marvel Family, Captain Marvel battles dastardly villains like Mr. Mind and the Monster Society of Evil! But now, his greatest foe has attacked the Rock of Eternity – the source of the Marvel Family’s power – and it could mean the end of reality as we know it! What impossible villains are Sivana teaming up with who could spell doom for the Multiverse? From where did Sivana’s children get their newfound super powers? And what does the appearance of one mysterious comic book mean for the heroes of Thunderworld?
Find out all that and more in this exciting issue that acts as chapter five of THE MULTIVERSITY.


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

phoning-it-in:

THE MULTIVERSITY: THUNDERWORLD #1
Written by GRANT MORRISON
Art and cover by CAMERON STEWART
1:10 B&W Variant cover by CAMERON STEWART
1:25 Variant cover by CLIFF CHIANG
1:50 Variant cover by CULLY HAMNER
1:100 Variant cover by GRANT MORRISON
On sale DECEMBER 17 • 48 pg, FC, $4.99 US • RATED T
Retailers: This issue will ship with five covers. Please see the order form for details.
The fifth chapter of the greatest adventure in DC Comics history is here!
Acclaimed for their collaborations on BATMAN AND ROBIN, SEAGUY and SEVEN SOLDIERS OF VICTORY: THE MANHATTAN GUARDIAN, superstar writer Grant Morrison and renowned artist Cameron Stewart deliver some magic to THE MULTIVERSITY with a breathtaking journey to Earth-5 – A.K.A. Thunderworld!
With a single word, Billy Batson transforms from boy reporter for Whiz Media into the world’s Mightiest Mortal – Captain Marvel! Along with the other members of the Marvel Family, Captain Marvel battles dastardly villains like Mr. Mind and the Monster Society of Evil! But now, his greatest foe has attacked the Rock of Eternity – the source of the Marvel Family’s power – and it could mean the end of reality as we know it! What impossible villains are Sivana teaming up with who could spell doom for the Multiverse? From where did Sivana’s children get their newfound super powers? And what does the appearance of one mysterious comic book mean for the heroes of Thunderworld?
Find out all that and more in this exciting issue that acts as chapter five of THE MULTIVERSITY.


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therearecertainshadesoflimelight:

gwendabond:

GET TO KNOW DC COMICS QUEEN: Lois Lane
↳ “[Lois Lane] just has this absolute loyalty for what is good and right and just, and it parallels what Superman is and what he embodies.”

Perfection.

Perfectly imperfect.

(Source: sexyclois)

4,153 notes