A good article with some great information in the comments. You may noticed my love for Captain Marvel, so this gets my seal of approval. 

comicsalliance:

STEEL YOURSELF FOR MATT FRACTION & CHRISTIAN WARD’S ‘ODY-C’ WITH THIS PROLOGUE THAT WILL NOT BE IN THE COMIC
By Matt D. Wilson
When it was announced back in January, we knew three things about ODY-C, the new Image series by writer Matt Fraction and artist Christian Ward: It was a retelling of The Odyssey, would take place in space, and the characters would all be gender-swapped.
What wasn’t as clear was just how trippy and brutal it would be, but if the five-page prologue Ward posted to his Tumblr last week is indicative of what the whole series will be like, those are the words to describe it.
Ward was sure to note that these pages won’t appear in the first issue of ODY-C, so get a good look at the prologue — with its positively luminous color palette, sometimes unorthodox panel layouts, and one big scene of someone getting sliced in two with a sword — now.
READ THE PROLOGUE AT COMICS ALLIANCE

comicsalliance:

STEEL YOURSELF FOR MATT FRACTION & CHRISTIAN WARD’S ‘ODY-C’ WITH THIS PROLOGUE THAT WILL NOT BE IN THE COMIC

By Matt D. Wilson

When it was announced back in January, we knew three things about ODY-C, the new Image series by writer Matt Fraction and artist Christian Ward: It was a retelling of The Odyssey, would take place in space, and the characters would all be gender-swapped.

What wasn’t as clear was just how trippy and brutal it would be, but if the five-page prologue Ward posted to his Tumblr last week is indicative of what the whole series will be like, those are the words to describe it.

Ward was sure to note that these pages won’t appear in the first issue of ODY-C, so get a good look at the prologue — with its positively luminous color palette, sometimes unorthodox panel layouts, and one big scene of someone getting sliced in two with a sword — now.

READ THE PROLOGUE AT COMICS ALLIANCE

106 notes

keiren-smith:

Been asked for my opinion (in phone calls and PMs I’ve gotten) and I’ve pointed out that I’ve tried to not comment on ‘the’ cover directly (I’m sure I slipped up somewhere! Gotta be honest, I giggle so hard every time I see it that it’s hard to put a thought together). My…

248 notes

brianmichaelbendis:

Batman Incorporated #1 cover by J.H. Williams III

brianmichaelbendis:

Batman Incorporated #1 cover by J.H. Williams III

(Source: marvel-dc-art)

448 notes

First look at the Thing from the upcoming Fantastic Four reboot from director Josh Trank. 
READ MORE.

First look at the Thing from the upcoming Fantastic Four reboot from director Josh Trank. 

READ MORE.

6 notes

A Thought on Multiversity #1 

By Weird Beard 

Grant Morrison’s Multiversity finally arrived this week, and everyone in the comic news/analysis business is talking about it. You may have seen that we reblogged Comicsalliance annotations of it, and that we posted this video already to help anyone new to Morrison and the comic understand it more easily. Morrison’s work has a reputation of being dense and hard to understand, but Multiversity is probably one of his most-straightforward and easily understood first issues in a while. It’s still filled with Morrison’s trademark blend of science, magic, cultural references, and superhero lore, which means there’s plenty to examine in this first issue. Here is a thought I had in examining the bad guys. 

So, as said in the video, the multiverse exists in the fifth dimension, which was revealed to be imagination by Bat-Mite in Morrison’s Batman R.I.P. This means that Mr. Mxyptlk and his kind exist beyond even Monitor space. Considering the Gentry’s power to battle and defeat a god and then a Monitor, it would seem to suggest that the Gentry are Fifth Dimensional intelligences/organisms. I think this is also true because Thunderer states that they are from behind the Invisible Rainbow, which I take to mean the white space of the Source where all colors become invisible when they are one, since when white light is refracted it becomes a rainbow. Unified as white light, the individual colors are impossible to see, but refracted through the multiverse, the colors are visible. 

If this is true, then it would seem that the stories most relevant to Multiversity from Morrison’s bibliography would be JLA: Crisis Times Five and his recent run on Action Comics. In each story, the primary villain is a denizen of the Fifth Dimension. The Gentry mentions that there is only one rule they follow. I suspect this rule is the need for invitation/permission to operate inside the multiverse, because in both of the previously mentioned stories the power of the bad guy may have been omnipotent but they needed to be anchored in the world by a human host. This would be most similar to the concept of familiars, which relates back to the power of the Fifth dimensional beings described as magic (rather than technology) and Morrison’s habit of adding multiple meanings to create his own meaning out of this kaleidoscopic perspective he applies to his writing.  

If the Gentry are Fifth Dimensional creatures, then we get the haunted element talked about in the promotional material and in the comic Nix Uotan was reading, from the fact that the Gentry are imaginary creatures interacting with both the fictional (to us) world of superheroes and the mysterious narration boxes that question who’s voice is in your head as you read them. Ghosts are often described as ignorance combined with figments of our imagination in our more scientifically advanced world. What was once a part of our collective perception of concrete reality has been moved to our imagination, but as Morrison is showing, the imagination is moving back into our world. We are thus being haunted by negative, personified avatars of our imagination, and Morrison is just channeling this interaction through narrative to create an experience that blurs the line between concrete and abstract reality. Anyone familiar enough with Morrison’s personal beliefs and thoughts on fiction may interpret Multiversity not as a story Morrison is telling, but as an experience he had and is processing on a number of personal levels by using narrative as external memory, proof, and catharsis. Morison doesn’t just write superheroes, he’s seen them save the world. 

But, all of this is dependent upon what is revealed in future issues, so we shall see if I’m right about the Gentry’s origin. Until then, share your thoughts on what you think the Gentry are with us. 

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johnbyrnedraws:

Captain Marvel & Mary Marvel from proposed Shazam! reboot by John Byrne. 1989.

From Back Issue #12, as quoted by Brian Cronin at Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #99, John Byrne on why it did not happen.

The reason this [project] didn’t happen was that going in, I said I want this to be a separate universe. I want this to be not connected with the DC Universe in any way. And DC said, yep, fine, that’ll be great, that’ll be good. And then I had actually done the cover and the first two pages of the first issue and they said, “Oh, by the way, Cap has to be in the Justice League [Here, Byrne most likely just means that “Cap has to be in the DC Universe, as Cap’s Justice League days were past by this point].” And I said no, we agreed. And they said he has to be, it’s absolutely necessary. I said, well, bye then. It was another one of those cases where I made my unreasonable demands loud and clear, up front, they agreed to them, and then said, “Oh, no, we’re changing our minds.”

Below the character drawings are the two pages John did. The first image was used for the first page of OMAC #2. John explained on his website:

The first page, as some of you may already know, was salvaged from my aborted SHAZAM project. When DC double-crossed me (this time before the contracts were signed!) I pulled out of that project and took back the work I had done on good faith. When I needed a splash for the second issue of OMAC, I did some cosmetic surgery, removing characters and altering the vintage of the automobiles, and what had begun as Fawcett City became the setting for Buddy Blank’s adventures in the Past.

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kristaferanka:

so here’s a bit of a treat. This is a piece I did that has never been shown in any capacity ever. This is Unused art I made a few years ago to along with the Captain American Premium Format statue from Sideshow Collectibles from the first film.. It was inevitable never approved in time to be produced along with the statue, but I’ve finally received word I can share it, so at least there is that. 

kristaferanka:

so here’s a bit of a treat. This is a piece I did that has never been shown in any capacity ever. This is Unused art I made a few years ago to along with the Captain American Premium Format statue from Sideshow Collectibles from the first film.. It was inevitable never approved in time to be produced along with the statue, but I’ve finally received word I can share it, so at least there is that. 

3,018 notes

brianmichaelbendis:

JLA Earth 2 by Frank Quitely

brianmichaelbendis:

JLA Earth 2 by Frank Quitely

(Source: onegeeksblog)

1,056 notes